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A PRESENTER’S WORK DOESN’T JUST STOP AT PRESENTING A PROGRAMME, EXPECIALLY IF HE / SHE IS THE PRODUCER

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A PRESENTER’S WORK DOESN’T JUST STOP AT PRESENTING A PROGRAMME, EXPECIALLY IF HE / SHE IS THE PRODUCER OF THE PROGRAMME. HE OR SHE MUST BE PART OF THE WHOLE ENSEMBLE. HOW? SEE MORE.

 

Besides being a fantastic Producer of Documentaries, Mary Mosindi doubled as the Presenter and Producer of the Music Programme Folksongs for the period it lasted on NTA Network. Producing for television and on a national platform for that matter, entailed a lot. Every week had a new episode and expectedly each episode came with its own challenges. Rehearsals were scheduled, new songs had to be learnt. And all the Singers with the Production Crew comprising the Camera Men, Vision Mixer, Set Designer, Lighting, Engineering and Audio Personnel, the Director, and of course, the Presenter cum Producer – Mary Mosindi, the Programme Co-ordinator (Deacon Sam Ihegie – Ohhh! God rest his elderly sweet soul), a pensioner then with NTA and responsible for compiling and teaching the songs – everyone must be on ground and punctual too. Scheduling a recording day during the week was largely dependent on how well the songs had been mastered by all including the Presenter, and also if the Set Designer had done his work of building the Folksongs set which he must strike at the end of each recording.

As soon as recording was over, as the Producer, Mary must check the tapes for good quality audio and visuals and then when satisfied that all was well and everyone had left, her work still continued. Amazingly, she is also an Editor and she edits all her programmes including Folksongs. Editing Folksongs back then was quite easy and it took few hours to achieve great results. Editing entails re-arranging shots, removing unwanted shots or adding some artistic effects which were not available at the time of recording. The end result – simply great.

Interestingly, the work of a Producer does not stop at churning out or making a great programme. The edited Folksongs had to be transmitted on a time allotted to it on the NTA Network belt and only until it was aired for the general public to see and feedback received – then and only then could Mary the Producer heave sighs of relief and she could say her work had been successfully done, most especially if the feedback received from watching the programme was favourable and the programme commended. But that wasn’t all – almost immediately there and then, she would begin to make plans for the next episode to be aired the following week and the process would start all over again.

Oh well, well, well, what do you think?

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